Hard Times

Hard Times

Book - 1981
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Random House, Inc.
Written deliberately to increase the circulation of Dickens’s weekly magazine, Household Words, Hard Times was a huge and instantaneous success upon publication in 1854. Yet this novel is not the cheerful celebration of Victorian life one might have expected from the beloved author of The Pickwick Papers and The Old Curiosity Shop. Compressed, stark, allegorical, it is a bitter exposé of capitalist exploitation during the industrial revolution–and a fierce denunciation of the philosophy of materialism, which threatens the human imagination in all times and places. With a typically unforgettable cast of characters–including the heartless fact-worshipper
Mr. Gradgrind, the warmly endearing Sissy Jupe, and the eternally noble Stephen Blackpool–Hard Times carries a uniquely powerful message and remains one of the most widely read of Dickens’s major novels.
Dickens's widely read satirical account of the Industrial Revolution. Dickens creates the Victorian industrial city of Coketown, in northern England, and its unforgettable citizens, such as the unwavering utilitarian Thomas Gradgrind and the factory owner Josiah Bounderby, and the result is his famous critique of capitalist philosophy, the exploitative force he believed was destroying human creativity and joy. This edition includes new notes to the text. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Baker & Taylor
Thomas Gradgrind destroys the spiritual and emotional lives of his children by denying the importance of human feelings

Baker
& Taylor

Thomas Gradgrind destroys the spiritual and emotional lives of his children by denying the importance of human feelings, in a stark critique of capitalist exploitation and a condemnation of the philosophy of materialism prevalent during the Victorian Industrial Revolution. Reissue.

Publisher: New York : Bantam, 1981
ISBN: 9780553210163
0553210165
Characteristics: 301 p. ; 18 cm

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a
Aisling_1
Jul 05, 2016

Only Charles Dickens can create a story that is both satirical and tragic. The title matches the story; and it is a great piece of literature. I would recommend.

k
katherinekar
Jul 14, 2014

Dickens is my favourite author, his books are an mix between great stories and equally good words. This book is no exception.

g
gcai101
Feb 25, 2013

I really enjoyed the main plotline and I loved the style of writing in this book. However, this book was really hard to get through. Even though it’s relatively small, it’s not a very easy read. Many of Dickens’ descriptions were very beautiful, but also very lengthy. It took a lot of effort and concentration to get past all the fluff and to the real meat of the story. I often feel that if a book requires THAT much hard work to get through, then it’s not worth reading; this was not the case with this book. Once you get into the story, you’ll be willing to work hard to understand the story and the messages it conveys. Overall, I really liked this book.

Rinve Jul 09, 2012

This is my favorite of Charles Dickens.

v
vcc
Oct 01, 2011

This is the first book that I’ve read of Dickens. I did not care for the storyline, and actually found it rather boring. I have been told that this is not his best work, so maybe I'll eventually attempt another of his books, such as "A Tale Of Two Cities." (Jan 2002)

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Rinve Jul 09, 2012

"Now what I want is facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out anything else." This is my favorite quotes because it inspired me to work harder.

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