Mining and Communities in Northern Canada

Mining and Communities in Northern Canada

History, Politics, and Memory

Book - 2015
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For indigenous communities throughout the globe, mining has been a historical forerunner of colonialism, introducing new, and often disruptive, settlement patterns and economic arrangements. Although indigenous communities may benefit from and adapt to the wage labour and training opportunities provided by new mining operations, they are also often left to navigate the complicated process of remediating the long-term ecological changes associated with industrial mining. In this regard, the mining often inscribes colonialism as a broad set of physical and ecological changes to indigenous lands.

Mining and Communities in Northern Canada examines historical and contemporary social, economic, and environmental impacts of mining on Aboriginal communities in northern Canada. Combining oral history research with intensive archival study, this work juxtaposes the perspectives of government and industry with the perspectives of local communities. The oral history and ethnographic material provides an extremely significant record of local Aboriginal perspectives on histories of mining and development in their regions.

With contributions by:
Patricia Boulter
Jean-Sebastien Boutet
Emilie Cameron
Sarah Gordon
Heather Green
Jane Hammond
Joella Hogan
Arn Keeling
Tyler Levitan
Hereward Longley
Scott Midgley
Kevin O'Reilly
Andrea Procter
John Sandlos
Alexandra Winton


This collection examines historical and contemporary social, economic, and environmental impacts of mining on Aboriginal communities in northern Canada. Combining oral history research with intensive archival study, this work juxtaposes the perspectives of government and industry with the perspectives of local communities.

CONTRIBUTORS: Patricia Boulter, Jean-Sébastien Boutet, Emilie Cameron, Sarah Gordon, Heather Green, Jane Hammond, Joella Hogan, Arn Keeling, Tyler Levitan, Hereward Longley, Scott Midgley, Kevin O’Reilly, Andrea Procter, John Sandlos, and Alexandra Winton.


Book News
For many Native communities and groups, their first exposure to resource extraction economic policies and western colonialism, is through mining. Although some indigenous peoples have benefited from the economic and training opportunities provided by the mining industry, the vast majority have found mining to be disastrous to their way of life. Disrupting settlements and social traditions, these mines leave long lasting ecological and societal scars decades after they have been played out and abandoned. This collection of essays focuses on the impact mining has had on First Nations communities in Northern Canada. The authors draw from oral history, archival research, and current legal cases to show how mining has disrupted these communities geographically, environmentally, economically, socially, and spiritually. The authors use the findings of this research to compare the perspective of government and mining industry policy against that of the local communities affected by the mines. Distributed by Michigan State U. Press. Annotation ©2016 Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR (protoview.com)

Publisher: Calgary:, University of Calgary Press,, 2015
ISBN: 9781552388044
Characteristics: xiv, 441 pages ; 23 cm
Additional Contributors: Sandlos, John 1970-,
Keeling, Arn

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