Democracy Delayed

Democracy Delayed

The Case of Castro's Cuba

eBook - 2002
Rate this:
Book News
Following regime classifications developed by Juan Linz and Alfred Stepan in Problems of Democratic Transition and Consolidation , López (political science, U. of Illinois at Chicago) compares Cuba with the "most-similar systems" of East Germany, Czechoslovakia, and Romania in order to investigate the reasons for the continuing political survival of Fidel Castro. He argues that "civil society" groups were and are of crucial importance in organizing opposition to communist regimes and argues for U.S. attempts to strengthen such opposition. The embargo, on the other hand, he sees as counterproductive to bringing about "regime change." This work was originally announced as: Democratizing Cuba; Lessons from Eastern Europe and U.S. Foreign Policy . Annotation (c) Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Johns Hopkins University Press

With the dissolution of the Soviet Union, foreign policy analysts and international relations scholars expected communist Cuba to undergo transitions to democracy and to markets as had the Eastern European nations of the former Soviet bloc. But more than a decade after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Castro remains in power, with no sign that the Cuban government or economy is moving toward liberalization. InDemocracy Delayed, political scientist Juan López offers a searching and detailed analysis of the factors behind Cuba's failure to liberalize.

López begins by comparing the political systems of three Eastern European states—the former German Democratic Republic, Czechoslovakia, and Romania—with that of Cuba, in order to identify the differences that have allowed Castro to maintain his hold over the government and the economy. López also shows the various conditions promoting change, including the development of civil society groups in Cuba, and discusses why some U.S. policies help the possibility of democratization in Cuba while others hinder it. While the Catholic Church in Poland and the Protestant Church in East Germany fostered change, the Catholic Church in Cuba has not taken a defiant stance against authoritarianism but seems instead to be biding its time until Castro is out of the picture. In conclusion, López argues that a political transition in Cuba is possible even under the government of Fidel Castro. Some necessary conditions have been missing, but it is possible that U.S. policies could lay the groundwork for democratic charge.



Blackwell North Amer
More than a decade after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Castro remains in power, with no sign that the Cuban government or economy is moving toward liberalization. In Democracy Delayed, political scientist Juan J. Lopez offers a searching and detailed analysis of the factors behind Cuba's failure to liberalize.
Lopez begins by comparing the political systems of three Eastern European states - the former German Democratic Republic, Czechoslovakia, and Romania - with that of Cuba, in order to identity the differences that have allowed Castro to maintain his hold over the government and the economy. Lopez also shows the various conditions promoting change, including the development of civil society groups in Cuba, and discusses why some U.S. policies help the possibility of democratization in Cuba while others hinder it.

Publisher: Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002
ISBN: 9780801877728
0801877725
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xxxv, 232 pages)

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at PPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top