Water War in the Klamath Basin

Water War in the Klamath Basin

Macho Law, Combat Biology, and Dirty Politics

eBook - 2008
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Water War in the Klamath Basin highlights and explores the common elements that are fundamental to natural resource conflicts and that must be overcome if conflicts are to be resolved. It is a fascinating and wide-ranging look at a topic of great importance for anyone concerned with the management, use, and conservation of increasingly limited natural resources.


In the drought summer of 2001, a simmering conflict between agricultural and environmental interests in southern Oregon’s Upper Klamath Basin turned into a guerrilla war of protests, vandalism, and apocalyptic rhetoric when the federal Bureau of Reclamation shut down the headgates of the Klamath Project to conserve water needed by endangered species. This was the first time in U.S. history that the headgates of a federal irrigation project were closed—and irrigators denied the use of their state water rights—in favor of conservation. Farmers mounted a brief rebellion to keep the water flowing, but ultimately conceded defeat.

In Water War in the Klamath Basin, legal scholars Holly Doremus and A. Dan Tarlock examine the genesis of the crisis and its fallout, offering a comprehensive review of the event, the history leading up to it, and the lessons it holds for anyone seeking to understand conflicts over water use in the arid West. The authors focus primarily on the legal institutions that contributed to the conflict—what they call “the accretion of unintegrated resource management and environmental laws” that make environmental protection so challenging, especially in politically divided regions with a long-standing history of entitlement-based resource allocation.

Water War in the Klamath Basin explores common elements fundamental to natural resource conflicts that must be overcome if conflicts are to be resolved. It is a fascinating look at a topic of importance for anyone concerned with the management, use, and conservation of increasingly limited natural resources.


Baker & Taylor
Shows how to identify career options with an environmental focus or find companies concerned about pollution

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In the drought summer of 2001, a simmering conflict between agricultural and environmental interests in southern Oregon’s Upper Klamath Basin turned into a guerrilla war of protests, vandalism, and apocalyptic rhetoric when the federal Bureau of Reclamation shut down the headgates of the Klamath Project to conserve water needed by endangered species. This was the first time in U.S. history that the headgates of a federal irrigation project were closed—and irrigators denied the use of their state water rights—in favor of conservation. Farmers mounted a brief rebellion to keep the water flowing, but ultimately conceded defeat.

In Water War in the Klamath Basin, legal scholars Holly Doremus and A. Dan Tarlock examine the genesis of the crisis and its fallout, offering a comprehensive review of the event, the history leading up to it, and the lessons it holds for anyone seeking to understand conflicts over water use in the arid West. The authors focus primarily on the legal institutions that contributed to the conflict—what they call “the accretion of unintegrated resource management and environmental laws” that make environmental protection so challenging, especially in politically divided regions with a long-standing history of entitlement-based resource allocation.

Water War in the Klamath Basin explores common elements fundamental to natural resource conflicts that must be overcome if conflicts are to be resolved. It is a fascinating look at a topic of importance for anyone concerned with the management, use, and conservation of increasingly limited natural resources.

Blackwell North Amer
Green at Work, initially published by Island Press in 1992, was the first source of information to help nontechnical but environmentally concerned job seekers learn about career opportunities with environmental companies or within the newly emerging "green" corporate culture. Now entirely revised and expanded, this indispensable volume again offers invaluable tools and strategies for launching a green career.
Susan Cohn has expanded her scope beyond the business world to examine environmentally focused, nontechnical careers in a wide variety of fields, including communications, banking and finance, consulting, design and the arts, public policy, nonprofits, and more. Every step of the jobseeking process is covered, from identifying personal values, skills, and goals, to researching potential companies and organizations, to interviewing. This completely updated edition includes profiles of over 70 individuals illustrating how they have woven their skills, values, and passions into their work; listings of more than 400 companies with contact names, addresses, phone numbers, information on what the company does, and its environmental programs and policies; listings of over 50 organizations, publications, and other resources; and a bibliography of recommended readings.

Publisher: Washington DC : Island Press, ©2008
ISBN: 9781597268806
1597268801
159726394X
9781597263948
1597263931
9781597263931
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xviii, 260 pages) : illustrations
Additional Contributors: Tarlock, A. Dan 1940-

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