Zoe's Tale

Zoe's Tale

Book - 2008
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Zoë Boutin-Perry travels to the fledgling colony world of Roanoke with her adoptive parents, John Perry and Jane Sagan, who have accepted positions as administrators. When her biological father develops the technology to give the Obin consciousness and self-awareness, she suddenly becomes the center of a critical but endangered treaty between the Obin and the Colonial Union.
Publisher: New York : Tor, 2008
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780765356192
9780765316981
Characteristics: 335 p. ; 22 cm

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kentickner
Mar 31, 2018

Somehow I did not pick up on Zoe's Tale being a rewrite of The Last Colony and so was confused thoughout about whether I had read it before. Shame on Scalzi, rewriting a story and presenting it like a new. Interesting fast read, though, and the author says he did his research on how a fifteen-year old girl feels and thinks. But, in the end, not the best use of my time.

Two point five stars.

g
ghalbertmck
Feb 01, 2018

"The Last Colony" from John and Jane Perry's daughter's POV. Well told and exciting.

a
Astraeus
Mar 06, 2016

This book is essentially "The Last Colony" (the previous book in this series) told from another character's point of view. However, it reads more like a Young Adult fiction book as opposed to the previous books in this series, which focused on politics, science fiction and action. It's not necessarily a bad book, but it doesn't have the same appeal as the previous entries, since much of the plot (and the conclusion) are already known to the reader. Therefore, you may wish to skip this book and head straight to the next book in the series "The Human Division" which restores the series to its original genre.

KateHillier Jan 07, 2016

You would think this would be a bit of a filler book, being it is a retelling of the previous book "The Last Colony." The winning factor here is the point of view is Zoe's and considering her unique position in the politics of The Colonial Union. Also, Zoe has a real winning personality. Even when she's being a teenager she's still loveable and you see her learn from her missteps. Especially interesting is Zoe's relationship with her Obin companions, Hickory and Dickory, and how she relates to the race as a whole as either a minor goddess or a favoured reality TV star depending on how you think of it.

Do you need to read this? Probably not but you're missing out for sure if you skip it

JeremiahSutherland Dec 22, 2012

This is entirely too cutesy in the Robert Heinlein style. Think Podkayne of Mars and anything after Stranger in a Strange Land. Facile and folksy.

a
Anya42
Oct 06, 2011

Although this is a parallel story meant to fit in with some other books in a series, it was a very satisfying stand-alone.

The story is told by teenager Zoe, with wit and humour. In spite of the rather grand scope of her experiences, the telling of it all remains intensely personal.

Zoe's Tale reminded me somewhat of Podkayne of Mars--if Heinlein had only written Podkayne as a fully developed character (as Scalzi did with Zoe), or had a clue how teenage girls think (as Scalzi clearly does).

I'll definitely be checking out more books by this author.

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