Telex From Cuba

Telex From Cuba

A Novel

Book - 2008
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Baker & Taylor
Coming of age in mid-1950s Cuba where the local sugar and nickel production are controlled by American interests, Everly Lederer and KC Stites observe the indulgences and betrayals of the adult world and are swept up by the political underground and the revolt led by Fidel and Raul Castro. 75,000 first printing.

Blackwell North Amer
Rachel Kushner has written a riveting novel set in the American community in Cuba during the years leading up to Castro's revolution - a place that was a paradise for a time and for a few. The first novel to tell the story of the Americans who were driven out in 1958, this is a masterful debut.
Young Everly Lederer and K. C. Stites come of age in Oriente Province, where the Americans tend their own fiefdom - three hundred thousand acres of United Fruit Company sugarcane that surround their gated enclave. If the rural tropics are a child's dreamworld, Everly and K. C. nevertheless have keen eyes for the indulgences and betrayals of the grown-ups around them - the mordant drinking and illicit loves, the race hierarchies and violence.
In Havana, a thousand kilometers and a world away from the American colony, a cabaret dancer meets a French agitator named Christian de La Maziere, whose seductive demeanor can't mask his shameful past. Together they become enmeshed in the brewing political underground. When Fidel and Raul Castro lead a revolt from the mountains above the cane plantation, torching the sugar and kidnapping a boat full of "yanqui" revelers, K. C. and Everly begin to discover the brutality that keeps the colony humming. If their parents manage to remain blissfully untouched by the forces of history, the children hear the whispers of what is to come.
At the time, urgent news was conveyed by telex. Kushner's first novel is a tour de force, with the urgency of a telex from a forgotten time and place.

Baker
& Taylor

Coming of age in mid-1950s Cuba where the local sugar and nickel production are controlled by American interests, Everly Lederer and KC Stites observe the indulgences and betrayals of the adult world and are swept up by the revolt led by Fidel and Raâul Castro.

Simon and Schuster
Rachel Kushner has written an astonishingly wise, ambitious, and riveting novel set in the American community in Cuba during the years leading up to Castro's revolution -- a place that was a paradise for a time and for a few. The first novel to tell the story of the Americans who were driven out in 1958, this is a masterful debut.

Young Everly Lederer and K. C. Stites come of age in Oriente Province, where the Americans tend their own fiefdom -- three hundred thousand acres of United Fruit Company sugarcane that surround their gated enclave. If the rural tropics are a child's dreamworld, Everly and K.C. nevertheless have keen eyes for the indulgences and betrayals of the grown-ups around them -- the mordant drinking and illicit loves, the race hierarchies and violence.

In Havana, a thousand kilometers and a world away from the American colony, a cabaret dancer meets a French agitator named Christian de La Mazière, whose seductive demeanor can't mask his shameful past. Together they become enmeshed in the brewing political underground. When Fidel and Raúl Castro lead a revolt from the mountains above the cane plantation, torching the sugar and kidnapping a boat full of "yanqui" revelers, K.C. and Everly begin to discover the brutality that keeps the colony humming. Though their parents remain blissfully untouched by the forces of history, the children hear the whispers of what is to come.

At the time, urgent news was conveyed by telex. Kushner's first novel is a tour de force, haunting and compelling, with the urgency of a telex from a forgotten time and place.

Publisher: New York : Scribner, c2008
Edition: 1st Scribner hardcover ed
ISBN: 9781416561033
141656103X
Characteristics: 322 p. : map ; 24 cm

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sheojuk
Jul 22, 2013

An interesting read, and she gets the mindless entitlement of colonial Americans right. But the book is full of anachronisms. I suspect her editor is 30-ish, and neither Rachel nor her editor seems to realize magic markers and plastic bags- to name just 2 things- did not exist in 1952, much less in Cuba.

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cvig
Aug 25, 2012

This book is about Cuba pre-,during, and post-revolution in the 1950's. Told from multiple characters' perspectives, including a wealthy American pre-teen born and raised on a Cuban sugar plantation. When forced to evacuate Cuba, he is devastated and feels a loss at having to leave his "home" country. Discusses all sides of the revolution, from the wealthy sugar lords to the soldiers fighting for the people's revolution, with the common theme that all share a love of their country. Paints an interesting, whimsical at times, perspective of Cuba during this historical time period.

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